Are Presidents More Controversial in Their Second Term?

An interesting study idea I had. Would not be difficult to do. Essentially, the hypothesis is that presidents are more controversial in their second term because they don’t have to worry about re-election. One additional prediction could be that this association increased after FDR’s presidency because it was made law that presidents couldn’t take more than two terms. A reason this might not be as strong is that George Washington’s precedent was strong enough to dissuade anyone else from taking more than two terms anyways.

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Getting rid of traffic laws

After getting a (second) speeding ticket today, I decided to revisit an interesting topic: open roads. Essentially, this has been done in a few European countries. It is a system where there are really no traffic laws. The roads are shared by bikers, pedestrians, and cars (in some cases), and things like speed limits, traffic lights, etc. are done away with. To drivers like me, this is paradise. But is it sustainable?

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Percent Black and Crime

An interesting predictor of local crime rates is the percent of the region examined that is black. Some may point to this and say that this is a result of discrimination. This is unlikely, as Rubenstein (2016) finds “Victim and witness surveys show that police arrest violent criminals in close proportion to the rates at which criminals of different races commit violent crimes.” Other reasons could include socioeconomic standards in the neighborhood, race differences in IQ, and underlying genetic differences in crime-committing-variables (aggression, ASB, etc.). Whatever the cause, the evidence for the association is documented in this blog post.

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