Marijuana does not increase creativity

It would be certainly interesting, and possibly useful, if marijuana were found to expand creativity acutely or even in the long term. Creativity is a trait which is largely desired and beneficial within Western culture. Being considered creative or even considering oneself to have done creative things fuels the ego, gives one a sense of individuality, and ultimately creates pleasure within humans. It is also commercially useful as one must produce unique products in order to stand oneself out within the market and increase profits. So, any potential to increase creativity, either for a short time or in the long run, is very sought after.

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The Schedule level of a drug has NOTHING to do with its safety.

I recently listened to the Joe Rogan Experience episode with Hamilton Morris. Hamilton had some really, really strong points that I had not thought about, of which I might elaborate over the span of a couple different posts. In this one, I want to strengthen my previously held argument that the Scheduled Drug list is not only contradictory, but it is also idiotic, ill-intentioned, and perhaps evil.

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Psychedelics Don’t Cause Psychosis

The main thing that people fear from psychedelics, aside from the harms of intensely bad trips (which can be prevented through proper drug education, instead of constant fear mongering), is that these drugs allegedly cause people to develop psychotic symptoms. Given my positive view on drugs on Twitter and in other blog posts, you can probably, correctly, guess I think this is BS.

I didn’t want to go and describe the details of all the studies on this, so here’s a table of some larger studies I’ve known of. Basically, once you control for familial risk factors, usage of other drugs, etc. the effect disappears. Considering psychedelics are a good way of dealing with most of these problems, I see no problem with the usage of these controls. Some may criticize that not all of this research is directly related to psychotic symptoms or schizophrenia. Sure, but the fact that psychedelics decrease violence and mental health problems is surely decent evidence for now.

CitationFindings
Johansen and Krebs, 2015Massive study (N > 130,000) found psychedelic usage was not associated with mental health problems like suicidal behavior, depression and anxiety, etc. when controlling for sociodemographics, other drug use and childhood depression.
Nesvag et al., 2015Replies to last study and argues they over-adjusted in their methodology. The authors argue the study should be done with a different sample to provide accurate results. [note on this paper at bottom]
Hendricks et al., 2015aUsage of main psychedelic substances was associated with significantly reduced likelihood of past month psychological distress, past year suicidal thinking, past year suicidal planning, and past year suicidal attempts.
Hendricks et al., 2015bPsilocybin usage provides benefits expanded upon in last source
Ajantaival, 2014“No independent association between any recency of any psychedelic use and increased likelihood of past month psychological distress, past year suicidality, or everyday impairment was found. A decreased likelihood for past year suicidal thinking was found among all groups that had last used psychedelics >12 months ago or psilocybin <1 month ago, as well as for past year suicide plans and past month serious psychological distress among those whose last psychedelic use was psilocybin >12 months ago.”
Strassman, 1984Existing evidence at the time was incredibly weak. From what was available, it appeared the best studies showed very low adverse reactions to the drugs while the worst studies, which often featured participants with already negative characteristics taking drugs which we of unknown purity, showed the largest effects.
Hendricks et al., 2018Psychedelic usage was associated with lower criminality within the general population.
Walsh et al., 2016Psychedelics decreased likelihood of committing domestic abuse against one’s intimate partners.
* Hendricks et al. (2015b) argues this same critique can be applied to all of the research finding an effect opposite to Johansen and Krebs (2015). They agree this is definitionally overadjustment, but that a lot of evidence shows that failure to control for these things are a failure to control for some suicide risk factors. Therefore, they believe this control is not inappropriate or actually represents true overadjustment bias.

Fin.

Psilocybin, IQ, and the Stoned Ape Hypothesis

A while back, I wrote a post discussing the potential for psychedelics to increase intelligence. There are many reasons this is of particular interest. For one, we have been looking for an “IQ pill” for a long time now with no luck. The main choices are nootropics like modafinil, Adderall, etc. Unfortunately, these don’t seem to work too well. Second, there are obvious benefits to a higher IQ, particularly in the labor market (Gwern, 2016; Strenze, 2015; Salgado and Moscoso, 2019). Third, as I will talk about shortly, even a very small, but significant increase in intelligence due to psilocybin may have some interesting implications for the so-called Stoned Ape hypothesis.

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Does Cannabis Legalization Decrease Productivity?

One particular concern with cannabis legalization or drug legalization in general is that it may reduce the amount of productivity. The classic story goes like this: people use drugs, particularly cannabis which has more sedative effects than the other drugs up for consideration, and they become addicted to them, become lazier, somtimes leaving their jobs, going on welfare, etc. and getting sucked into a life of drugs. Perhaps this is a more extreme version of the argument. If so, I am also disagreeing with the moderate version. Anyways, does it hold up?

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Psychedelic Usage May Boost Intelligence

Recently, I posted a couple studies on Twitter which suggested long-term ayahuasca use increased intelligence.

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